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Author Topic: Writing partner issues  (Read 2026 times)
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rnbrewer
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« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2009, 11:40:49 PM »

I agree with Don on this one. Don't give up on the idea of a writing partner. They are more useful than you might think. Also, you must bare in mind that if you break into the biz you will no doubt end up working with one anyway. Directors, producers, actors, and even other writers will be giving, and in many cases demanding changes . Chances are, you're not the only one who will be recieving a writing credit. Either way, you'll end up working with other writers. Some you may not like, others you'll love. Better to get used to it now than later.

Ryan
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ScriptNurse
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« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2009, 09:36:08 PM »

I wouldn't rule out a writing partner altogether, but it's clear that the RIGHT person is needed. I'm sorry your experience was so difficult. In the case of my partner and I, be both know we NEED each other and in that sense we are interdependent ... to our advantage. I hope your next experience is a far better one.
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Don BledsoeWant to write screenplays? READ SCREENPLAYS!
Screenwriter & ProducerWant control? GO TO FILM SCHOOL!
Representation: Eileen OFarrell, OFarrell Management (818) 985-3136
Attorney: Paul S. Levine (310) 450-6711
Websites: Script Nurse, Go With The Flo Productions Inc., Queen Dad
ivan
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« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2009, 11:13:14 PM »

I dont know what it is scriptnurse, he only wrote about 30% of it so I really do not understand. To me its just another script, just another story. Regardless I know better for the future no more writing/collaborative partners.
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ScriptNurse
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« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2009, 11:35:31 PM »

I'm just guessing here ... but I'd bet he's enamored with the script, yes? To him, it's art?

This often happens. One of the hardest things to learn as a writer is that IT WILL ALL BE CHANGED. That's just the way it is. You will never have your way unless you produce and direct it yourself and even then, you'll probably have to change stuff. Everyone who touches the script you've written is going to change it.

Screenplays are not literature. They are guides on how to make a movie to tell a certain story. That's it, folks. If you fall in love with your stories, you're dead. You must be willing to compromise, unless you never want anything you've written to ever be made into a movie.
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Don BledsoeWant to write screenplays? READ SCREENPLAYS!
Screenwriter & ProducerWant control? GO TO FILM SCHOOL!
Representation: Eileen OFarrell, OFarrell Management (818) 985-3136
Attorney: Paul S. Levine (310) 450-6711
Websites: Script Nurse, Go With The Flo Productions Inc., Queen Dad
ivan
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« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2009, 11:10:27 PM »

Thanks for the in-depth help.

Sorry for my delayed response but I read the responses and got back to work this week.

Three of the five actors read the script as so did the special effects person, dop, my wife, and best friend... Along with my partners family and friends. 80% of the people who read it found the inconsistency in the story I found. So we discussed it and he doesn't want anything changed so I asked him to remove my name from the script cause I do not feel my work is up to par with out the ability to edit and rethink some stuff.
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ScriptNurse
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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2009, 08:00:16 PM »

If you're looking for a collaboration agreement, here's the one I paid my entertainment attorney to write for me and my partner ... http://scriptnurse.com/wcms/index.php?agreements
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Don BledsoeWant to write screenplays? READ SCREENPLAYS!
Screenwriter & ProducerWant control? GO TO FILM SCHOOL!
Representation: Eileen OFarrell, OFarrell Management (818) 985-3136
Attorney: Paul S. Levine (310) 450-6711
Websites: Script Nurse, Go With The Flo Productions Inc., Queen Dad
rnbrewer
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2009, 12:52:22 AM »

I agree with Don on this one. It's very important when working with another writer to find the middle ground. Having a read-through of your script is something I would suggest even if there wasn't a conflict of interest. Some things alude us durring the writing process that we just can't see with our own, selfish eyes. I say selfish because it's often tough for us to look past our own writing. I've lost touch with a few scripts in the past because I was too enamored with my accomplishments to see what I had done wrong.

Writer's often don't like the idea of changing something in their work. That is why it's also a good idea to take a break from your script when you finish the first draft. A week, maybe even two just to make sure. Then you can come back to it with fresh state of mind and taking the old "red pen of death" to all your hard work doesn't seem so bad.

I work with a writing partner quite often. We don't have any written agreements at the moment, but I'm not worried about it. We went to high school together and more or less share a brain. That doesn't mean we haven't had our disagreements in the past.

Personally, I would do the read-through first and speak with the actors afterwards. Find out their coments and if there's anything they thought could use some polishing, and if you find that their comments reflect your concerns then take it up with your partner. Let him know how strongly you feel about it (whilst maintaining your manners) and actually ASK him to at least try to comprimise.

At this point, if he's still being stubborn about it than you might want to consider backing out. 

Padnar also makes a good point about trust. If your teaming up with someone you don't know or who's work your not familiar with it can easily lead to situations such as the one you're experiencing. That's not to say it can't work. Writer's team up with other writer's they don't know all the time. The thing is, you need to have, at the very least, a verbal understanding of how things are going o work.

For example:

My writing partner and I made a point to figure out each others strengths and weaknesses. If your partner is better at writing snappy, witty dialogue and you're better at creating dramatic, action packed scenes, then let him handle the dialogue and you can focus on the action.

I hope this is helpful to you and I wish you luck.

-- Ryan
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padnar
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« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2009, 10:13:45 PM »

Well basically we have to trust people.
in my case as I am an Indian English writer
I definitely needed a mentor and a guide .
Llo-Jo is a partner and he helped me a lot
and I owe mu success to him
Padma
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ScriptNurse
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« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2009, 05:10:36 PM »

First, it will not look bad.

Second ... are you really giving this a chance? Sounds like this is moving along at the speed of a rocket ship. I would try this ... do a reading of the script with actors. Both of you will do nothing but listen to the way it's REALLY being read ... no coaching or directing, just listening. Stories sound VERY different when the words are coming out of the mouths of actors and not writers. The purpose is for you both to get a dose of reality, not your imaginations. You'll likely find that some things work and some don't ... and probably not all of the ones you expected either. TAKE NOTES.

After it's all done, you need to decide ... (1) will you compromise in order to get the project made? (2) Can you both give a little and find a meeting of minds in the middle somewhere that are acceptable to you both? (3) If you leave the project, will to retain your writing credit? There are  other issues, but this seems like a good place to start.
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Don BledsoeWant to write screenplays? READ SCREENPLAYS!
Screenwriter & ProducerWant control? GO TO FILM SCHOOL!
Representation: Eileen OFarrell, OFarrell Management (818) 985-3136
Attorney: Paul S. Levine (310) 450-6711
Websites: Script Nurse, Go With The Flo Productions Inc., Queen Dad
ivan
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« on: March 06, 2009, 12:39:19 AM »

Ok so I screwed around and answered a local Craigslist ad, some guy was looking for some horror writer to join up with and put together a low budget feature. Well since I just bought a nice HD Camcorder and allot of goodies I figured what the heck.

So I partnered up with this guy, (he's cool doesn't seem like a snake or anything) I came up with the idea, we did an outline bounced a few ideas off each other. I came up with some really gory stuff but also converted the story into more the thriller/Suspense genre and got to writing. After 50/50 on the project 5 days later we were at 97 pages... I re-read the story and... well it doesn't click... (Far too much to explain) So I emailed the guy and we been going back and forth on this for a few days and he wants to keep it the way it is and I want to change allot of stuff that just puts us in a non original category. He insists on keeping it as is.

So my question is, is it wrong of me to back out of the project? I feel like I would be going back on my word but at the same time I really don't have my heart in it cause its not the way I see the story unfolding. Will this look bad in the long run for my career if I even end up with one at all.
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