Script Nurse Forum
April 17, 2014, 07:53:16 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Movie Magic Screenwriter
News: YOU MUST REGISTER in order to post and use the CHAT ROOM. It's FREE. Access to the many sub-boards of THE STORY DEPARTMENT and LEARNING, EXERCISES & WORKSHOPS is limited to MEMBERS ONLY, so click on the REGISTER tab below and join us for free. MAIN SITE returns you to the main Script Nurse website and HOME brings you back to the top of the forums. CHAT ROOM access is automatic once you've registered.
 

  MAIN SITE   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Follow Me on Pinterest
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Writers Strike  (Read 6596 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
uncle_al
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 662



View Profile
« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2007, 08:54:30 PM »

You know, if screenwriting was easy, everyone would be doing it, and while it seems as though everyone IS, that's not the case.
True, not everyone is.  Only in Ell Lay and environs, I guess.

Al B.
Logged

Now FORTIFIED with BLOG!
http://alexanderfilmworks.wordpress.com/ NEW SITE!

I write for the same reason I breathe - because if I didn't, I would die.
--Isaac Asimov
ScriptNurse
Head Nurse
Private Coach
Screenwriter-Producer
*
Posts: 1530


Head Nurse


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2007, 08:20:02 PM »

You know, if screenwriting was easy, everyone would be doing it, and while it seems as though everyone IS, that's not the case. Rent THE PLAYER for a slightly exaggerated rendition of what happens when producer, directors and studio people think they can write.
Logged

Don BledsoeWant to write screenplays? READ SCREENPLAYS!
Screenwriter & ProducerWant control? GO TO FILM SCHOOL!
Representation: Eileen OFarrell, OFarrell Management (818) 985-3136
Attorney: Paul S. Levine (310) 450-6711
Websites: Script Nurse, Go With The Flo Productions Inc., Queen Dad
seansshack
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 215



View Profile WWW
« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2007, 01:17:09 PM »

No worries. Not ranting (much) myself.

Not saying anything of what I'm saying is right (or wrong). Just see it heading this way.

Perhaps we will all need to change with it.

Logged
rnbrewer
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 216


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2007, 01:07:15 PM »

Also true. But I highly doubt that actors, sets, and other elements of current film will go the way of the Dodo. In fact, I'd prefer if they didn't. I don't think of actors and sets as "limitations" I look at them as creative devices. Yes, there are limits, but I think it's those same limitations that help to push our creativity. I've already expressed my views on art in another posting in another subject, so I'll forgo any in depth explanations here.

So far as acting is concerned (and I've been told they plan on going on strike too in the near future) I see no reason why actors should be "replaced" with digital ones. Acting is one of the oldest, if not THE oldest art forms our species has ever created. Completely eliminating actors from film would be no different than eliminating them from stage. It's like saying, "Hey, you've got talent kid, but unfortunately for you this here computer is easier to work with. It doesn't whine and it never gets sick. Also, we don't have to feed it or pamper it. It's cheaper for sure. So I guess you're just gonna have to say the heck with your dreams and aspirations and get yerself a job at Denny's."

If anything, I would prefer it if computer animation remained nothing more than another CREATIVE DEVICE. Not a replacement for creative all creative devices. We have to protect the Arts not abolish them. If we do that, we may very well see the end of civilization as we know it. (Okay, so I may be stretching it a bit there, but it is a well known fact that the first thing to go in all failed cultures and civilizations was the Arts. That has to mean something.)

Oh, and please don't take this little rant of mine the wrong way. I agree with you on many points and am not trying to start an argument or anything. I know I sometimes come across as though I am, so I feel I need to include this little disclaimer.

Ryan   Roll Eyes
Logged
seansshack
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 215



View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2007, 12:49:33 PM »

Quote
Building a computer animated model from scratch and making it move like a real human is no easy task.

True, but the system is becoming easier each year. Through movie and video game development. When you look at scenecaster (http://www.scenecaster.com). You can where things have the "potential" of heading towards. Large databases of 3d objects (motion and still), allowing for complex animations (at first) to be made by just about anyone. Imagine being able to "film" your own stories without the limitation of sets, actors, locations, effects? All combined with the perfect distribution medium: the internet. Over the years this type of tech "could" become off the shelf photo realistic. Granted hollywood will get it first. But with tech progression increasing each year, for how long is unknown. Look at the "cinema" type effects and cut scenes that can be produced in modern game engines (call of duty 4 etc). At the moment they do need motion capture studios. But what if people and objects start to get captured and stored at very high resolutions? You will only need to capture movements once.

Yes it will take time. But look at the effect the ipod/mp3 and the internet has had on music. Independent musicians now have a chance. So the big wigs are becoming more nervous. But making the mistake of fighting the internet purely through fear of file sharing and piracy. They should be embracing the medium and using it to their advantage, rather than fighting it. High definition will slow things like file sharing down. But as bandwidth increases, this will not be the case anymore.

As for harddisks and dvd's You can get over 1,000 movies in DVD form onto a fairly cheap external hdd. So that would make for a nice collection.

If you look at what Microsoft and Sony are attempting with their new consoles. I think physical media is on the way out. Which is good. Because the whole Blu ray, HD-Dvd debate is starting to become boring.

But I could be way off and we are still buying big studio movies on 100gb cd style disks in shops in ten years....
Logged
rnbrewer
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 216


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2007, 09:12:45 AM »

You mean like a "script generator" of sorts? That would truly be the day I put a bullet in my...foot. I think this kind of technology becoming the norm is still a long ways off. So we should have little to worry about. Then again, there are times when I wish I could just press a button and let the computer do the writing for me.  Wink

As for replacing actors with digital creations, I don't see this one happening any time soon either. Films like "Beowulf" may look cool and the animation can be some of the best on planet but there are still a few drawbacks to the medium. First, they still need to perform motion capture. The techniques have certainly improved over the years, but the concept is essentially the same. Building a computer animated model from scratch and making it move like a real human is no easy task.

Quote
The future of distribution mediums such as cinema and DVD is also in doubt, with independent internet distribution changing the field.

This couldn't be more true if it tried. I've been wondering how long it would take before the external medium's such as CD's and DVD's would be replaced by downloadable digital data. Hard Drives still aren't big enough to handle an entire library of movies, but the technology is there. I'm not sure what this means for the movie business, but I know what it means for me: No more DVD's taking up all the room in my house. Grin
Logged
seansshack
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 215



View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2007, 04:45:45 AM »

Writers may be low down on the pay and respect scale. But stick with it.

They will eventually replace actors and sets with computer simulations(mainly because of expense). The future of distribution mediums such as cinema and DVD is also in doubt, with independent internet distribution changing the field.

But one element that will be hard to replace or simulate, is the story. The writer or "concept artist" will always be needed. Even if in the future film makers will be making movies on the laptops as pure 3d computer simulated art. They still need a story.

Or perhaps someone will write a software program that knocks out scripts based on genre, length etc. (think someone already tried this).
Logged
ScriptNurse
Head Nurse
Private Coach
Screenwriter-Producer
*
Posts: 1530


Head Nurse


View Profile
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2007, 09:12:10 PM »

The impression one gets is that the feature film script was begat by radio writers. I do not believe this is true. The first radio program broadcasts began around 1920, while the motion picture screenplay format began about a decade earlier, but I believe it barely resembled the format we commonly use today. The modern screenplay format has been in its current form since about 1930, if not a little before. It's quirks serve a variety of purposes:

Budgeting
Scheduling
Preproduction planning
Room for copious note-taking during shooting
Editing
Postproduction
Logged

Don BledsoeWant to write screenplays? READ SCREENPLAYS!
Screenwriter & ProducerWant control? GO TO FILM SCHOOL!
Representation: Eileen OFarrell, OFarrell Management (818) 985-3136
Attorney: Paul S. Levine (310) 450-6711
Websites: Script Nurse, Go With The Flo Productions Inc., Queen Dad
uncle_al
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 662



View Profile
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2007, 06:03:34 PM »

I still think I read in one of my books a good number of early "scriptwriters" were playwrites. Or maybe it's just that a lot of old films were based on stage plays, thus, playwrites were held in high esteem. One of the two.
In the theatre, playwrights have control of the content, while directors only control how the content is presented.  In the movies, directors think they can control everything, including when (and where) the sun rises.
Alot of early screenwriters came from radio, bringing with them the script format we have today. 1 page = 1 minute air time or 1 minute screen time.
The tie-in between radio writing and screenwriting is, as I recall, tenuous at best.  It's much more evident in TV, especially since most early TV programming was a direct outgrowth of radio, and not movies.
TV script is the closest to the old radio scripts.
As witnessed by the above response to the quote.
Oooh, ain't I snarky?

Al B.
Logged

Now FORTIFIED with BLOG!
http://alexanderfilmworks.wordpress.com/ NEW SITE!

I write for the same reason I breathe - because if I didn't, I would die.
--Isaac Asimov
roadrunner2
Studio Screenwriter
**
Posts: 34


View Profile
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2007, 06:23:46 AM »

Quote
Super agent Michael Ovtiz went so far as to bash big sales claiming it would drive up actor and director pay, if writers get big money.

Gee, it's not like the actors and directors get paid scale. Roll Eyes  Why is it that some in this country are so greedy (rhetorical question here) and enjoy building their "prosperity" off the backs of the "little people"...

I might could answer my own question, but then that might make this here, "bottom feeder" look like I used the ol' noggin'  Roll Eyes 



Logged
Write Or Wrong
Studio Screenwriter
**
Posts: 35


View Profile
« Reply #12 on: November 14, 2007, 09:04:21 PM »

So do you think spec scripts will become an endangered species?  That would be the last brick sealing off the wall between the powers that be and the unwashed masses of writerdom. 

At least as it stands now, if you have an original, interesting, and well written script, you have a moderately good chance of obtaining agent representation, and all the doors that can open...
Logged
FLM
Studio Screenwriter
**
Posts: 34



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2007, 07:23:32 PM »

Alot of early screenwriters came from radio, bringing with them the script format we have today. 1 page = 1 minute air time or 1 minute screen time.
TV script is the closest to the old radio scripts.
As for the the attitude toward writers, I assume you mean the current more so than the past.
Writers have always been bottom feeders until the early '90s when Black and Eszterhas dragged us from the mire. $4 mil for a treatment. My hero!
Studio heads and hated that writers got sacks of cash and banded to together to kill off the big sale prices. Thank Mr. Katenzberg for that one.
Super agent Michael Ovtiz went so far as to bash big sales claiming it would drive up actor and director pay, if writers get big money. All the while he was repping writers at CAA. That plan sure worked out well didn't it? I'd like to live to see the day a writer gets $20 mil for a picture. Yeah right...
Anyway, all that killed writers from moving up & killed big spec sales and that's when assignment writing became fashionable AKA writing producer's scripts.
There is more to it but that's it in a nutshell.
Logged

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\"Write without pay until somebody offer pay. If nobody offers pay within three years, the candidate may look up this circumstance with the implicit confidence as the sign that sawing wood is what he was intended for\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\"
Mark Twain
rnbrewer
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 216


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2007, 01:08:02 PM »

Kind if reminds me of Fritz Lang's "Metropolis," Al. We've got the big guys up top with all the power neglecting the guys beneath and hiding the fact that, without the guys below, the city would cease to function. Ironic isn't it?

I still think I read in one of my books a good number of early "scriptwriters" were playwrites. Or maybe it's just that a lot of old films were based on stage plays, thus, playwrites were held in high esteem. One of the two.
Logged
uncle_al
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 662



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2007, 07:58:43 PM »

I remember reading about how the first screenwriters were playwrites and how playwrites tend to get a lot more respect in the industry than a standard screenwriter. I understand that film is a collaborative process, but I'm curious as to when the industry changed. Why? When did Hollywood suddenly decide that the writers would serve only a minimal role?
From my memory (and research sources from back in the day), film started as a "novelty item", showing things and people moving, without benefit of story   When stories were introduced, in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries, they were simple, sometimes made up on the spot, and quite often constructed in the editing room after the fact.  (Porter's Life of an American Fireman, as an example.)  Until sound came in in the 1920's, "scenarios" (as they were called) were only sometimes structured, especially in the comedy area.  Chaplin, Keaton, Lloyd, never used written scenarios, and often "winged" their stories as they went along.

The studio system had been in place for long enough, at this time, to lump "scriptwriting" in with "scenarios", and put them in the unenviable position of "bottom of the food chain".

They need us.  They know they need us.  They just don't want us to know they know.

{sound of exasperated sigh}

Al B.
Logged

Now FORTIFIED with BLOG!
http://alexanderfilmworks.wordpress.com/ NEW SITE!

I write for the same reason I breathe - because if I didn't, I would die.
--Isaac Asimov
rnbrewer
Screenwriter-Producer
*****
Posts: 216


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2007, 09:32:15 AM »

A buddy of mine recently informed me of the term "scab." Actually I thought he said "stabber," but I could be wrong. I understand what it's about and why, but it still sucks that everything has to be put on hold. I sympathize with the writers, I really do. I see no reason why we shouldn't get the credit/respect we deserve. I'm just concerned about my (hopeful) future in the industry. I have a couple of projects that I would like to submit, but I also don't want to step on anyone's toes.

I remember reading about how the first screenwriters were playwrites and how playwrites tend to get a lot more respect in the industry than a standard screenwriter. I understand that film is a collaborative process, but I'm curious as to when the industry changed. Why? When did Hollywood suddenly decide that the writers would serve only a minimal role?
Logged
Script Nurse Forum
   

Follow Me on Pinterest
 Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  







Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

Bad Behavior has blocked 66 access attempts in the last 7 days.